For the 3rd installment in my re-cap of the Learn to Train 4 Seminar, I am supposed to be re-capping Steve Pulcinella’s presentation.  If you don’t know Steve, he is the owner of Iron Sport Gym in Philadelphia, Pa.  He has competed in powerlifting, strongman, and still competes in the Highland Games as a masters competitor… basically, he is strong as hell!   (Oh, and he also has a cult following with his face on these t-shirts!  He is famous!)

So… here I am trying to regurgitate the amazing presentation given my Stevie P.  The problem with me doing this is 3-fold:

1. I am not nearly as funny as him

2. I am not nearly as attractive as him (see picture below)

3. I had to go to the bathroom REALLY badly at one point during his presentation and then I got stuck talking to someone and I missed a big chunk of it.  =(

Sooo… I am sorry Steve.  But I am not going to be able to do your presentation justice whatsoever (I don’t really feel that badly… because Steve forgot to mention me in his LTT re-cap on Elite until I called him out on it.  I guess he made up for it… but Pssshhht!  That was NOT cool! ;-D)

 

This man is one tough son-of-a-gun! I wouldn’t mess with him!

 

From what I WAS able to watch, this is what I gathered:

1.  An intense training atmosphere makes you stronger. There is a reason people hit PR’s when they train at EliteFTS or Westside Barbell or Iron Sport gym… the atmosphere is a huge reason for that.

2. Competition among training partners is a wonderful and healthy thing.  You want to train with people who are stronger than you at least at something.  If you’re the strongest guy/gal in every lift within your group of training partners, you need to find new training partners.

3. Yoke walks can help. (No clue what he was referring to here.  That’s all I wrote down. Oops.)

4.  If you start your own company… Be ready to bust your ass.  Most people have a super glamorous vision of what it will be like to own their own business.  That vision usually doesn’t include cleaning toilets.  But owning your own business usually does involved cleaning toilets at some point.  Especially if you own a gym.

5.  Common question:  Is there any way to train for the Highland Games? No.  Not in the gym.  You must practice the events specifically, although getting stronger in the gym can help.

6.  Don’t get a philly cheesesteak in Philly.  Get a roast pork sandwich from Tony Luke’s in South Philly.  You’re welcome.

7.  Charge what you’re worth.  At one point, Steve raised his gym prices quite a bit and it actually did the business a lot of good because it showed more value.  He didn’t get any more volume with a lower price.

8.  Triangle of Domination – Hard Training, Good Nutrition, Good Attitude.  These are the keys to success when it comes to training.  So many people try to do a bunch of super complicated stuff and end up getting nowhere.  Sure, once you’re an advanced lifters, more advanced techniques can be helpful… but for most beginner and intermediate trainees – a simple and basic routine that is done with intensity, coupled with sound nutrition, and a good attitude, will get the majority of people where they want to be.  So keep it simple, stupid! =)

 

Talking about the Triangle of Domination!

Well folks, that’s all I have from Stevie P!  I wish I was able to listen to the whole presentation.  Besides dropping knowledge bombs (and F bombs) he is freaking hilarious!  I wish we could have chatted more!

 

So what do you think?  Do beginner trainees complicated things too much?  Is owning your own business glamorous or not?  Philly cheesesteak or roast pork sandwich?  Let me know what you think below!

 

 

 

One Response to EliteFTS Learn to Train 4 – Part 3

  1. A “Yoke Walk” is probably a Yoke Carry, which is where you get under this gizmo, and lift it an inch (or so) off the ground (with it resting on your back), and basically do a “Walking squat” — The Farmer’s Walk is the “walking deadlift” where you grab one in each hand andwalk with them. (Google ‘Strongman’ and ‘Yoke’ for a better definition.)

    2 good things about these, Molly:

    #1 — A tall person (like you or me!) is not disadvantaged that much: Once you pick up the gizmo and start walking with it, it matters NOT your height, so, short & tall people — people with a long OR short reach all carry the same load. (Unlike in the deadlift where tall people effectively pull from a deficit LOL.)

    #2 — Walking with these things gives you exercise in a different kind of way than just picking things up & putting them down. (All the same: I “pick things up — and put them down.” — Said in an ‘Aaahnold Schwarzenegger; accent.)

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